About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 27
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to say is you have to learn to pay that and that's exactly what the reagan administration did when they found themselves with somebody they can do business with. it could and ronald reagan may have been the only guy in the administration that believed in the near option that by god u.n. after. and here i ha
of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
. my father had been a career army officer for a period in the u.s. army and served in world war ii and korea and later became a hospital administrator. >> so you say conservative, orthodox conservative reform? >> right in the middle. >> did you fight in the 1967 war? >> i was a kid. >> you were a kid. did you fight any war? >> i fought in a couple of them, yes. i fought in the lebanon war. i was quite involved in the lebanon war. i served in the israeli paratroopers. i was in the israeli special forces. >> what year? >> june 1982. wars in the middle east occurred in june, almost to the day. it's probably a good war- fighting weather. i was among the first forces to -- of israeli forces to enter the city of beirut in june 1982. my actual unit was decimated in an ambush and we ended up being attached to all sorts of other units for the duration of the war. later on, i became one of the few israelis to be a veteran of the gulf war. in a period just before the outbreak of the gulf war, i was assigned as a strategic liaison between the army and the u.s. fleet. in the book, i went out th
commissioner mcdowell and i were part of the u.s. delegation to dubai where we worked together to defend free and open internet. i would note that members of committee staff on a bipartisan basis were there as well and we are fighting for internet freedom and openness. the situation in dubai right now is food, people are -- we have a strong american delegation on the ground led by ambassador kramer and including representatives from across government and the private sector. the situation is fluid. the issues are important and i think we all understand that this will not be the last conference at which these important issues arise and fighting for internet freedom and openness is something we will all be working on together for quite some time. in the u.s. the broadband sector is strong and the u.s. has regained global leadership in mobile communications. we have more healthy subscribers than the rest of the world combined, and setting the pace globally on innovation and no software apps and devices. this means we face a particularly acute challenge to meet exploding mobile demand, the spectru
, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for t
of the shares. the u.s. is on the head with an auction model based on the elegant simplicity of one course concept, marcus, not the whims of regulator specific to ensure productive and innovative use. i know from some of your testimony you have pointed out, especially some new commissioners the success the sec has had over the years that doing good auctions. however, we've learned overly prescriptive rules can lead to less than successful auction results. the fcc so uncovered the d block auction to lower the megahertz licensed for the prime brought in spectrum failed to garner more than a few token bids and those who are well below the true value of that very important spectrum. the fcc must avoid overly prescriptive option was the land market mechanisms and have a proven record of success. remember, the revenue generated in part to pay for the middle-class tax cut and extension of unemployment benefits will be used to help pay for the interoperable public safety broadband network and to fund the next jan 9/11 service and invest in public safety research and development. they failed to rai
the same thing by the way, if you would rather sit in an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. a longstanding dhaka, or suppose you want to contribute to a alleviating a social tragedy in this country. each year thousands of babies born to a drug-addicted mothers there is a charity you can contribute to that tries to use a market mechanism to solve this terrible problem. they offered any and drug addicted woman $300 to be sterilized. the use of the market incentive. or suppose you have a new drug let's say you are a pharmaceutical company. you have a new drug that you want to market to the public. you can market it directly to consumers. you have seen those ads on television. if you see them on the nightly news or sporting events for prescription drugs you can be forgiven for thinking the greatest of crisis in the world is not malaria or sleeping sickness. you know what i am thinking of the rampant the epidemic of the of erectile dysfunction. these are signs of the times. over the last three decades almost without realizing it, we have drifted from having a market economy to b
just add something u.s. senator whitehouse said. we hauled out photographs of the national wildlife refuge. we are looking to the west here. it used to be a freshwater wetland refuge. now it's largely the bottom part is the delaware bay. there is a road in the top corner that comes west to east to delaware bay. that road is under water quite a bit of the time now. but he used to be you could drive towards the delaware bay and as you've got to the bank, there's a parking lot where people can park cars or trucks or whatever. there's no parking lot. he couldn't stand they are to the east of the parking lot used to be, to the right about 1:00 you can see a concrete rockers sticking up out of the water. that concrete bunker used to be 500 feet west. used to be 500 feet west. you hurt me here with tongue-in-cheek with stephen stills who want that something is happening here. but it is exact ways that clear. my hope is that others will see that, too. >> thank you him so much. it will cause senator gillibrand. we are so happy senator whitehouse just opened the door and were just thrilled th
around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the
jobs by the hundreds of thousands in the 1960s and early '70s, the largest industrial cluster in the u.s. in the 1950s was not automobile production in detroit, it was garment production in new york city, and that sector was decimated by globalization and new technology. the city had been caught in a spiral of disorder, rising crime rates, racial conflict just like here in boston, and the fiscal situation had gotten out of control with budgets that were far too high for the city to afford. it looked as if new york was going to go back to the weeds, right? this is an image of jimmy carter wandering through the wasteland that the south bronx had become, and it really seemed as if the planet of the apes image of the statue of liberty rising from the sand, that that was plausible. that, in fact, these cities were things, you know, whose time had come and gone. in part, the future of the city seemed so dim because their original reasons for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. the
this year, when the state of florida sued the u.s. government for court determination of the preclearance under the voting rights act of 1965, preclearance of five counties, for discrimination, and further, sued the u.s. government by questioning the constitutionality of the 1965 voting rights act. in the discovery for that case, the testimony was taken of this former general counsel of the florida republican party. and what i would like you to know is this key individual who, with your permission, with the committee's permission i'd like to insert those documents in the record -- that his testimony, given in april, mr. mitchell said, and it's in the sworn testimony, that he was asked to draft the original version of the legislation that became the law. he was asked to drafted by republican party leaders, specifically after consultations with andy palmer, then the executive director of the florida gop, frank, head of the gop state house campaigns, and joel springer, head of the state senate, republican campaigns. and in early talks with executive director of the florida gop. and with this
in 1876 and that was u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. so if there is any application that courts later extended that if it applied to anybody, who is the federal government. so it's a limitation on federal governments to tell certain classes. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted. but it only applied to the federal government unless specifically incorporated to the states. >> we didn't get on the second amendment until 2010 f
, lack of a better term, triball rivalries or the u.s. cooperation creates resentment among another group. they want to develop their neighbors, but not lackees of the americans. there's insight into the impact hispanic candidate -- impact that history's had. they are used to conquerors coming and going so they create a relationship in how they hedge their bets. apart from the human tragedies, your heart breaks reading about someone who had a baby, spoke to his wife before he went on the mission, and then died in a helicopter crash. your heart breaks on the human realm reminding you of the cost. it reminds you the low gist tick -- logistical challenges. >> did it make you regret our approach in afghanistan? >> no. i think it reminds us of the challenges of it. at the end of theday, afghanistan is important and important for multiple reasons. we don't want a safe haven in afghanistan for people to come back and reconstitute the safe taifn. to have an unstable afghanistan where radical islamists are organized is a danger to pakistan and its nuclear capabilities. they are concerned about tha
a second bite at the apple for bob. >> thank you. we are all familiar with the statistics. the u.s. spends on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. i was surprised to hear at a recent conference exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups. for seniors and people with disabilities. which raises the question in my mind, would it be better for us to try to rebalance our spending in the direction that allow people to stay in their homes, functioning well instead of institutionalizing them. which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens. because it makes no sense. we know that it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much support structures that i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized and long-term care and other settings, they are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat. most of the people were who are able to be treated within
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
in a ruling in 1876. that was u.s. versus cookshank, which arose out of a horrible massacre. one of the worst in the reconstruction period, where a whole -- hundreds or more, blacks, had tried to defend themselves in louisiana, and were attacked by a white crowd, and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers. on the grounds they had deprived the blacks who were killed of their right -- >> amend. >> guest: -- the supreme court didn't find that was the case. it said at that time we don't see there was any racial motivation at all here to deprive blacks of their rights specifically, and in a kind of aside, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. and so if there was any application, courts alert extended from that to say if it was depriving anybody, it was the federal government. so i was a limitation on the federal government. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted by the courts. only applied the federal government unless it was specifically inco
. it was the most important thing public schools could do, prepare the u.s. for the cold war. so they both ended up in a russian class and that's what the met. >> host: how long do they know each other before they got married? >> guest: they knew each other for five months. they met in september. they got married in february. she got pregnant before that. so it was, everything about it was, you know, it was not a normal courtship, normal, let me put it that way than what what were battle and and stanley's reaction to stanley ann bringing home an african? >> guest: maslin told another biographer, i met before i started this book. david mindel who did the first obama books in madelyn described obama senior to him as very strange. they were not happy. you know, i don't want to say horrified, but it was difficult for them. it wasn't necessarily because of race. there were a lot of elements to. his personality, that he was so much older. their daughter was barely 17 when they met and when she got pregnant. she was an incredibly intelligent young woman. so this had a very difficult effect on her life. th
to fail. the u.s. has occasionally bailed out the big intermediaries. under what circumstances does it make sense? >> what to do about it is more important than the volcker rule now we get to the heart of it that large institutions are protected and no doubt it was on a grand scale and the stockholders were wiped out. this is a big problem everybody is concerned about. there has not been enough attention. dodd/frank says no bailing significant financial institutions out to. the management and stockholders or the unsecured creditors at risk. how do you do that? they provide the override that the fdic so with that requirement the management is going common stockholders are going but the creditors with the final disposition are not fully liquidated. or they sell off. and they are all proud approaches. [inaudible] unless international you're dealing with the big international bank. but the critical thing with the big financial market you better get agreement between london and new york. i am not sure it is the law yet. there the same thing, as you can get some consistency around the wor
on in china today to what's going on in the u.s. but economies are much different, and certainly our systems of government are much different can. so it would probably be helpful for the overall conversation to set aside those comparisons. but i would like to kind of focus in on what's going on in california since the earlier panel was here. can you give can us an idea -- can you give us an idea of what the real timeline is that you expect it to be? when is this going to be up and running, and how much more money is it going to cost the taxpayers in northern wisconsin to subsidize california's high had high-speed rail? >> well, the investments across america amount to a little over $10 billion so far. that's federal so far. >> right. >> and obviously, states are putting in their own money. california's doing that. as i said, a high-speed rail in california over the next ten years. >> do you believe -- >> and cost is, currently, $69 billion -- even though you're a young man on your birthday here, you've been around a while. you've seen how this inflationary trend can go. do you have any guess
in the u.s.. >> host: i am so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely acclaimed and really important new documentary, "bully" and the coeditor of the book of the same title. both of which, as our nation's 30 little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids, on both sides and on the sideline, and their families. so thank you so much cynthia for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself? how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? y. here, why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in middle school, i was one of those kids who was really shy. i think i try to sail under the radar and i was someone who -- and i didn't know what to do about it. all of us i think in this country were starting to see people coming out in talking about their experience with this phenomenon that so many of us had have experienced in one way or another and have had no word for it other than adolescents, o
to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. and we were seeing parents writing into message boards. we were seeing every news story that. hundreds of comments from parents saying that my child is going through this. kids thing that i'm going through t
, in submitting for the congressional record our investigative report on the terrorist attack against the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, that claimed the lives of four americans who were serving our country. this report is indeed the last initiative that the chairman and i will produce together. it is the final work product of ten years of cooperation and collaboration and was authored in the same bipartisan spirit as our investigations into the attack at fort hood and into the government's response to hurricane katrina, among many others. i will so miss working with chairman lieberman. he is an extraordinary senator who has contributed so much during his years in the senate and as a leader of our committee. sadly, our last official act together was prompted by the terrorist attack in benghazi on september 11 of this year that took the lives of our ambassador and three others brave americans. our findings and recommendations are based on the extensive investigative work that the committee has conducted since shortly after the attack of september 11, 2012, including meetings with senior and
students. and if he won the u.s. senate seat, he did win the u.s. senate seat. rogers never heard from him, so he called him up and asked obama witty comment, and he said, i am too busy. i am getting phone calls from warren buffett and from steve jobs and bill gates in all of these important people. and he said, but you, it's. and obama said, well, you know, promises made by politicians, you don't believe us, do you? and he got very angry. and he demanded that we show it. eventually he did show up, obama did. but the point of the story is that some apolitical people that i've spoken to for this book told me similar stories in which they were there for him and obama and since they want, they want people, supporting him, organizing for him, contributing to him amah and that once he was elected, eventually to the presidency. it wasn't only african-americans. it was also jewish-american donors who gave him vast sums of money and never got their phone calls returned. it was oprah winfrey who worked hard for him and then was frozen out of the white house. caroline kennedy, on and on and on. the
, for the u.s. government, he is part of that but there are things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder. where he for instance puts a ruler, a ruler underneath a rock that talks about, that has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled. and then you are thinking, and he is making fun of his survey captains but the great thing is, we don't really know what he thought and he didn't leave much at all. >> we will be done with him for sure. >> so we will open the floor to questions. jack, what is your question? >> hi. a great talk, really enjoyed it. a two-parter. is the -- still around and the historical preservation office? >> well, the agent block is still around. where is a? there is a conference about it recently, and maybe three years ago at the india house but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time jamie kelly founded at the aquarium that robert moses was knocking down, he got it somewhere. maybe it's the historical society. i don't now remember it is but no, should have contacted them. i called the borough historian but it did not take. yea
are placed. and so when he goes out, went also then goes out on surveys for the u.s. government, he's part of that, but there's things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder, when he, for instance, put the rover, ruler underneath a rock that talks about, but has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled, and then you are thinking come he's kind of making fun of this survey. but the great thing is, we do really now what he thought. >> so, we open the floor to questions. jack, what's your question? >> hi. interesting talk, enjoyed it. is the atrium block still around? >> well, the atrium block is still around. where is it? there was a conference about it recently. maybe a few years ago. but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time kelly founded at the aquarium that robert louis was knocking down, he got it somewhere. a historical site. i don't know now where it is. i know i should have talked to them. i called the baroque historian -- borough historian. >> i want to ask a question. does every borough had a historic? >> i think so. i think there's a
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehensiv
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)